Halt My Mortal Friend

mcsiggy:

so i saw this post and i had to draw it out

raggedyasgardian:

I have been taking chemistry classes for the past few years, and I can tell you only one thing that Disney got wrong.

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Put your hair up.

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Put your hair up.

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PUT YOUR HAIR UP, IT’S A HAZARD.

greatjaggi:

yanahma:

greatjaggi:

What the fuck is the “super” in superwholock supposed to represent

Sigh. Look at this plebian. Lets get this cleared up once and for all:

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"Super" = Superbad

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"Who" = The Hoobs

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"Lock" = John Locke from Lost

Now can we please never have a misunderstanding about this again

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Well im glad that’s cleared up

the-doctor-says:

third on the first row is my personal favourite

zxxqnge:

This guy brought his whole fucking desktop into Starbucks.

tiredestprincess:

"why do you want to take a picture of that store" - my mom

tiredestprincess:

"why do you want to take a picture of that store" - my mom

vivzie-pop:


Day 20: Monster

I love playing around with Jiji’s design, I always feel theres more that I can tweak and add to it! Have her more werewolf-crazy self!

vivzie-pop:

Day 20: Monster

I love playing around with Jiji’s design, I always feel theres more that I can tweak and add to it! Have her more werewolf-crazy self!

So I drew Bill Cipher a while ago

goodknight2sday:

ryu-gemini:

goodknight2sday:

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everyone draws him all in a dapper suit

and then theres me

i really like katie tho UvU he’s my fav next to mine

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he’s beautiful

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gorgeous lil doritos 

disneyismyescape:

disney-beauty:

Accurate

help

blogzodiacmaccarthaighblr:

five nights at freddy’s 2

In the words of Zoey from Left4dead:

"RUN LIKE HELL"

wheresagnes:

aztec-princesss:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

*runs to target- i need to get my babydoll one for her 1st bday

ohmygosh and the one from Ethiopia has natural hair which you can’t get from the American Girl “just like you” dolls!

morg-ana:

ohmymckirk:

so-um-yeah:

aloistrancyhive:

breathe-squeeze-follow-through:

26 Male Survivors Of Sexual Assault Quoting The People Who Attacked Them

http://www.buzzfeed.com/spenceralthouse/male-survivors-of-sexual-assault-quoting-the-people-who-a

This needs more notes.

no one seems to care if they are guys 

reminder that rape and sexual abuse happens to everyone, not just girls

reminder that rape and sexual abuse needs to be acknowledged no matter a person’s gender and “no one seems to care if they are guys” is a typical antifeminist theory that is disproven by the fact that this photo set has 400,000+ notes alone